Barbaraanne's Hair Comb Blog


This stunning Manchu hair pin with every kingfisher feather in place, superb-quality jade, and coral branches sold for $800 on E-bay, October 28, 2011. The pin was in perfect condition. Look at the back: the intricacy of how each stone and feathered piece is set, as well as long tines, seal the deal.

Also on E-bay is a beautiful pair of hair combs and matching bracelet by Margot de Taxco. She was an American, Margot Van Voorhies Carr, who came to Taxco, Mexico, in 1937 and married Antonio Castillo of Los Castillo. In 1948, she divorced and set up her own workshop. These pieces feature gold-washed half balls surrounded by silver scrolls, are marked, and are in superb condition.

कंघी

For more scholarly research, please examine

Chinese and Japanese Hair Ornaments by The Creative Museum

Margot Van Voorhies: The Art of Mexican Enameled Jewelry

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Mercedes Robirosa was one of Yves St. Laurent’s favorite models in the late 1960’s and 70’s. Laurent chose Robirosa to model the Mondrian dress, which is in the permanent collection of the Metropolitan Museum’s Costume Institute.

After her modeling career, Karl Lagerfeld hired her to design jewelry for Chanel. Four years later, she went out on her own.

The newest acquisition of The Creative Museum, this comb came from her Karl Lagerfeld period. It was designed for one of his haute couture fashion shows.

Hammered brass finials surround a turquoise-glass stone. Your eye never loses interest in the finials’ asymmetrical nature. The comb is a great sculpture in its own right. It is signed, original, and in perfect condition. The intelligence behind these purchases are what differentiates a collection from a museum, and what makes The Creative Museum great.

कंघी

For more scholarly research, please examine

Yves St Laurent by Frances Muller

The Yves Saint Laurent-Pierre Berge Collection: The Sale of the Century


The Parthian Empire existed in Ancient Persia from 247 BC – 224 AD. It is also called the Arsacid Empire after Arsaces I of Parthia, the Parni tribal leader who conquered what is now, modern-day Iran’s northeast region. At its height, the Parthian Empire stretched from the Euphrates in south-eastern Turkey to eastern Iran. Because its territory included the Silk Road trade route between the Roman Empire and the Han Empire of China, the Empire became a center of world commerce.

It was succeeded by the Sassanid Empire (224-651 AD), which was considered to be equal in power to Rome. The Sassanids also invented the word, “Eran,” which later became Iran. It was the last pre-Islamic Persian empire.

Its art was multicultural, encompassing Persian, Ancient Greek, and regional traditions. These two Parthian pieces, a hair comb and pin, come from the Reza-Abassi Museum in Iran. The jewels are carnelians.

On this gold coin, you can see the Sassanid Emperor Shapur II wearing a crown.

कंघी

For more scholarly research, please examine

The Art and Archaeology of Ancient Persia: New Light on the Parthian and Sasanian Empires

Forgotten Empire: The World of Ancient Persia

Decline and Fall of the Sasanian Empire: The Sasanian-Parthian Confederacy and the Arab Conquest of Iran


Someone is selling a beautiful Chinese ivory comb made for export to the Victorian market, c. 1890. It has a lotus flower in the middle, with beautiful scroll work. Stylistically married on top are balls of the Peigne Josephine. You can tell it’s Chinese by the shape of the bottom bridge and tines underneath the decorative tiara. Lovely piece. I have my hair comb payments tied up until April of next year, so someone under 5 feet tall will not be bidding. ;-) We’ll see what happens at the end of the week! :-)

Another beautiful example of a Chinese ivory export comb comes from The Creative Museum. Two dragons or griffins are having a conversation.

Here is mine.

कंघी

For more scholarly research, please examine

The Comb, by Jen Cruse

Le peigne: Dans le monde, by Robert Bollé

Chinese and Japanese Hair Ornaments by The Creative Museum


In Latin, it is known as the Triregnum. The crown of the Roman Catholic Pope has three jeweled tiers, but is rooted in Byzantine and Persian design. In fact, the word, “tiara,” is Persian.

The bottom crown appeared in the 9th Century. Jewels were added when the Popes attained political power in the Papal States of Italy. In 1298, Pope Boniface VIII added a second layer to assert that spiritual dominion had precedence over civil authority. Pope Clement V was the first to wear the triple tiara with the cross on top and gold strips, c. 1314.

On the left, Pope Innocent III (1198-1216) wears an early papal tiara, juxtaposed with Pope Pius IX’s ornate version (1846-1878).

At Sotheby’s, an Italian model, which never belonged to any pope, will be auctioned off on Nov. 4. 2011. It has no cross and is made of gold, seed pearls, and gems. Date: c. 1840. Estimated Value: $15,000 to $25,000. The leather case stamped Marcus & Co., New York.

However, when preparing for his coronation, Pope John Paul II was asked if he would like to wear a papal tiara and answered, “This is not the time to return to a ceremony and an object considered, wrongly, to be a symbol of the temporal power of the Popes. Our time calls us, urges us, obliges us to gaze on the Lord and immerse ourselves in humble and devout meditation on the mystery of the supreme power of Christ himself.

A great man teaches us that a tiara can be more powerful in its absence than in its presence.

कंघी

For more scholarly research, please examine

Tiara by Diana Scarisbrick

Royal Jewels by Diana Scarisbrick

Crowns, including: Crown (headgear), Papal Coronation, Crown Jewels Of Ireland, Tiara, Imperial Crown Of India, Iron Crown Of Lombardy, St Edward’s … Holy Crown Of Hungary, French Crown Jewels

Love and Responsibility by Pope John Paul II


Henri Gillet used Art Nouveau designs to make lithographs, which were used as wallpaper from 1900 to the 1920’s. On one of them, he designed a horn comb. If it were ever made, I’d imagine the flurry of leaves to be plique-a-jour enamel. This lithograph is part of the Album de la Décoration, edited by A. Calavas and printed in Paris c. 1900.

कंघी

For more scholarly research, please examine

Design Motifs of the Decorative Twenties in Color by Henri Gillet

Henri Gillet. Le Voleur d’instants


A colleague of Charles Darwin, Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) spent a decade writing The Malay Archipelago. The Land of the Orang-utang and the Bird of Paradise.

Europeans were mesmerized by the red bird of paradise, as it reminded them of a lost Eden. Wallace wrote extensively on how he used native contacts to kill them, or rather to get specimens for study.

Unlike the kingfisher, Paradisaeas are not extinct. Here is a rubra and a minor in all their glory.

Tribal leaders feathered this ceremonial headdress from the wings of the red bird of paradise, cockatoo, parrot, and pigeon. It was acquired by the National Museum in Papua, New Guinea in 1906.

For parents who might show this blog to their children, they can reassure them that Kevin from the movie, “Up” was a Kelenken, an extinct prehistoric bird, who lived 15 million years ago in Argentina. No one made headdresses out of Kevin, so we can all breathe a sigh of relief. :-)

कंघी

For more scholarly research, please examine

Ethnic Jewellery and Adornment by Truus and Jeremy Daalder

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Longlocks Hair Sticks

http://www.longlocks.com

Your long locks are truly one-of-a-kind. Shouldn't your hair jewelry be?

Creative Museum

www.creative-museum.com

Two sparrows clutch berries in this clear horn comb by Albert Vigan, c. 1900

Jen Cruse. Author

The Comg: Its History and Development

Lavishly illustrated with over 500 photographs, this is a wide-ranging, scholarly reference book.

Miriam Slater: Artist, Collector

http://kanzashicollector.com

I hope to share the beauty of Japanese hair ornaments with a broader audience.

Kajetan Fiedorowicz: Artist, Collector

kdg.com.au

May peace and human kindness be victorious over war.

Jessica Beauchemin

www.jessicabeauchemin.ca

"to link the nuances of creation to the precision of the handwork"

ACCCI

www.antiquecombclub.com

The Museum Scholar

http://paper.li/BarbaraAnneMuse/1311651488

Connecting hair comb collectors and major museums

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